The New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJ-DOT) Electronic Statewide Transportation Improvement Program (e-STIP) is a web-based transactional software tool whose purpose is to enhance the development and management of the Statewide Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) through the electronic submission, processing and approval of amendments and modifications to the STIP through an intuitive and easy-to-use user interface. The NJ-DOT e-STIP allows NJDOT, NJTPA, SJTPO, DVRPC, NJ Transit, PANYNJ, FHWA and FTA personnel to view the STIP projects and make amendments or modifications to the STIP. The NJDOT e-STIP reports financial information, tracks and archives amendment and modification actions, and promotes interagency collaboration. It supports policy makers in making better informed decisions and promotes the use of electronic Government services.

The NJDOT e-STIP serves as an excellent reference for the general public as well. The general public has access to view some of the features, like tracking existing amendments and modifications, viewing the mapped STIP projects on the GIS maps, and viewing STIP projects and reports. The NJDOT e-STIP has been designed to provide additional impressive bene-fits to the users, as listed below:
  • Allows access to real-time STIP Amendments/Modifications
  • Helps streamline the STIP modifying and amending process
  • Reduces time needed to review and approve Amendments/Modifications
  • Manages Obligations for STIP projects
  • Provides financial data and up to date reports
  • Facilitates Visualization through Map Viewer
  • Offers improvements for the fiscal management of STIP
  • Provides users with a step-by-step guide to e-STIP functionality

REQUEST AMENDMENTS / MODIFICATIONS
For the federally-approved STIP, e-STIP allows MPOs to request amendments (e.g., new project) and modifications (e.g., modification of funding source, amount, or phase, changes in project description, etc.) via an electronic submission request. All necessary financial and technical information including a fiscal constraint chart pertinent to the request is attached in electronic format. Pending STIP amendment and modification requests can also be recalled to make any necessary changes or edits before sending them back in queue for review and approval. Authorized NJDOT and FHWA/FTA staff can then log in to system online to review and process (approve or disapprove) STIP amendments and modifications with an electronic signature and date stamp.

REVIEW AND PENDING
Enables FHWA planners/engineers to review, comment and approve the complete request online.

TRACKING
Provides for a full historical account of all actions taken by MPOs, NJDOT and FHWA/FTA on each STIP project during the Submission, Approval and Amendment/Modification phase.

REPORTS
Creates on-demand real time pre-formatted professional looking STIP reports in PDF and MS Word formats. The reports can be for individual projects or custom selected group of projects and up to the whole STIP report. Reports can be readily e-mailed or posted on the web page. For amendments, it produces concise Before and After Project Revision Sheets and the Reason for Modification is clearly stated on a separate page.

GIS
Displays interactive (pop-up) geographical map for viewing of STIP projects. The projects can be queried and selected on screen with a link to the detail project review information.

OBLIGATION
e-STIP allows DOT Project Managers to request FHWA's approval for their projects. FHWA approves the project and obligates the funding. The obligated amount and the date are shown with the remaining funding balance. This yields a list of obligated projects.

VIEW TIP/STIP
Enables state planners, elected officials and the general public to review up-to-the-minute status of the STIP at any time and from any internet-enabled personal computer.

DASHBOARD
Provides an overall view of the STIP Amendments/Modifications and Obligations of the STIP in chart and graph format.

STUDY & DEVELOPMENT
Provides users with a comprehensive list of Study & Development projects.

a. Overview

This document is the Statewide Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) for the State of New Jersey for federal fiscal years 2018 (beginning October 1, 2017) through 2027 (ending September 30, 2027).

The STIP serves two purposes. First, it presents a comprehensive, one-volume guide to major transportation improvements planned in the State of New Jersey. Second, it serves as the reference document, required under federal regulations (23 CFR 450.216), for use by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) in approving the expenditure of federal funds for transportation projects in New Jersey. The STIP is a valuable reference for implementing agencies such as the New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) and the New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ TRANSIT), and all other parties interested in transportation issues in the state.

Federal legislation requires that each state develop one multimodal STIP for all areas of their state. In New Jersey, the STIP consists of a listing of statewide line items and programs, as well as three regional Transportation Improvement Programs (TIPs), which were developed by three Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) covering the state. Those three TIPs contain local and state highway projects, statewide line items and programs, and public transit and authority-sponsored projects.

This STIP conforms to, and in many cases exceeds, the specific requirements of the federal regulations:
  1. It lists the priority projects programmed for the first four (4) years of the planning period. It also includes a priority list of projects to be funded over an additional six (6) years.
  2. It is fiscally constrained for the entire 10 years (A detailed discussion of fiscal constraint issues is found in subsection "i").
  3. It contains all regionally significant projects, regardless of funding source.
  4. It contains all projects programmed for federal funds.
  5. It contains, for information, state-funded projects.
  6. It contains expansive descriptive information.

Finally, the STIP is a 10-year plan that is fiscally constrained based on federal resources remaining flat for the NJDOT and NJ TRANSIT. State resources were assumed to remain flat in FYs 2018 through 2027. State funding consists of the Transportation Trust Fund (TTF), and Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ) funding resources.
b. Performance-based Planning and Asset Management

The NJDOT implemented an Asset Management policy detailing the agency's objectives and measures. This policy is the official institutional approach to managing infrastructure assets, and making capital investment decisions related to these assets. This approach serves to support and complement the 10-year Capital Investment Strategy (CIS), the 10-year STIP, the annual Transportation Capital Program, and the biennial Study and Development Program.

The NJDOT recognizes that there are ever-increasing challenges to funding transportation improvements. Asset management offers an alternative to focusing solely on problem spots and/or the worst conditions. The NJDOT defines asset management as, "the systematic process of maintaining, upgrading, and operating physical assets cost-effectively".

Recently, Performance-based Planning and Performance Management are terms used in relation to the broader use of performance to manage and improve the transportation system. Asset Management focuses on the subset of Performance-based Planning and Performance Management related to physical assets. However, the NJDOT has used, and is continuing to use, a Performance-based Planning approach to make capital investment choices. The NJDOT continues to seek out, and utilize, the best data and predictive models, to make the most effective, efficient and informed investment choices.
c. Public Participation Process

New Jersey is completely covered by its three MPOs: the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission (DVRPC); the South Jersey Transportation Planning Organization (SJTPO); and the North Jersey Transportation Planning Authority Inc. (NJTPA). This STIP incorporates their three separate TIPs without modification.

Each MPO has a public participation process for their regional transportation plan, TIP and conformity determination. The state makes copies of the STIP available at each MPO public meeting, and representatives from the NJDOT and NJ TRANSIT are present to answer questions and concerns raised by the public about the programs. The public comment period for each MPO TIP, and the STIP, runs for 30 days.
d. Statewide Transportation Plan

The federal statewide planning rule requires that the STIP contain projects consistent with the statewide Long Range Transportation Plan (LRTP). New Jersey's LRTP, Transportation Choices 2030, sets the direction for future investments. The Statewide Capital Investment Strategy (SCIS), shapes the investment priorities for this STIP. The SCIS functions as an instrument that links the LRTP to the 10-year capital plan (STIP), by connecting broad goals to specific investment choices. Within the context of an asset management approach, the SCIS guides the selection of projects and programs to reduce the backlog of deficiencies, to improve the condition of the transportation system and to achieve the best possible performance. Thus, both the SCIS and the STIP serve as mechanisms to achieve the vision of the LRTP.
e. Conformity for MPO Plans and Programs

The MPO Regional Transportation Plans are subjected to conformity analysis in order to demonstrate that each plan conforms to the State Implementation Plan (SIP). Each MPO TIP must be consistent with their conforming plan, such that the regional emission analysis performed on the plan applies to their TIP. This determination means that the implementation of projects and programs in the MPO TIPs will have a positive impact, in the aggregate, on air quality. Since the STIP contains the three MPO TIPs without modification, the implementation of the STIP conforms to the regional transportation plans and will also have a positive impact on air quality.
f. Congestion Management Process

All projects in this STIP that will result in a significant increase in carrying capacity for single occupant vehicles are supported by a fully operational congestion management process, in place at each MPO.
g. Development of the STIP

This STIP is the product of months of staff work, and deliberations, involving the NJDOT, NJ TRANSIT, county and municipal transportation planners and engineers, other transportation providing agencies, the public, and elected officials at the state, county, and municipal levels. The main decision-making forums for selecting projects for this program were the state's three MPOs:
  • NJTPA, covering Bergen, Essex, Hudson, Hunterdon, Middlesex, Monmouth, Morris, Ocean, Passaic, Somerset, Sussex, Union, and Warren counties;
  • DVRPC, covering Burlington, Camden, Gloucester, and Mercer counties;
  • SJTPO, covering Atlantic, Cape May, Cumberland, and Salem counties.

The process of building the current STIP began in the fall of 2016, with intensive staff work by the NJDOT, NJ TRANSIT, and the MPOs.

All projects that were identified as potential candidates for inclusion in the regional TIPs of each of the three MPOs were subjected to intensive screening to verify project scope, status, schedule, and cost. The resulting "pool" of projects was analyzed independently by the NJDOT, NJ TRANSIT, and the MPOs. Each project was then assigned a priority-ranking, based on the extent to which it would advance identified regional and statewide objectives. Such objectives are set forth in; the STIP, the LRTP (Transportation Choices 2030), the three MPO Regional Transportation Plans, the SCIS, air quality objectives, and the broad social and economic goals of the state Development and Redevelopment Plan. The NJDOT and NJ TRANSIT developed and circulated revenue projections, for planning purposes, to each of the MPOs, based on the best current assessment of available state, federal, and other funds. The NJDOT, NJ TRANSIT and each of the three MPOs entered into intensive discussions to negotiate a list of deliverable transportation projects that best fit the composite statewide and regional priorities within a financially constrained program. These negotiated project lists were used as the basis for publishing the Draft Transportation Capital Program Fiscal Year 2018 by the NJDOT and NJ TRANSIT in June 2017, and for preparing TIPs for further analysis by each of the MPOs. Projects in the STIP and three MPO's TIPs are consistent with the three MPO Regional Transportation Plans.
h. STIP Modifications and Amendments

The STIP may be modified or amended according to the procedures set forth in the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for TIP/STIP changes between the three MPOs, NJ TRANSIT, and the NJDOT. The MOU was fully executed in October 2012. STIP changes, once approved by the MPOs in concert with either NJ TRANSIT or the NJDOT, are forwarded to the FHWA and/or the FTA for their approval, when necessary. The modified and amended STIP is available for viewing through the eSTIP system, which is available on the NJDOT website.
i. Financial Plan

Federal law and regulations require that the STIP be fiscally constrained for the first four years. Specifically, "planned federal aid expenditures" cannot exceed "projected revenues." The major sources of funding identified in this document are; the FHWA, the FTA, the TTF and the PANYNJ. The NJDOT and its transportation planning partners (NJ TRANSIT, NJTPA, DVRPC, SJTPO, FHWA, and FTA) have developed an estimate of $14,883.3 million in available state, federal and other revenues to support the state's transportation budget during the four fiscal years from 2018 through 2021. (For planning purposes, state revenues are estimated on the basis of state fiscal years, which begin on July 1, and federal revenues are estimated on the basis of federal fiscal years, which begin on October 1.)

In addition, the NJDOT and NJ TRANSIT have incorporated an additional six (6) years of constrained resources into the 10-year STIP. The 10-year total is estimated to be $37,626.7 million. This amount constitutes the funding expected to be available to support the whole FY 2018 - FY 2027 STIP. These revenue estimates were developed cooperatively by the NJDOT, NJ TRANSIT, and New Jersey's three MPOs, in full consultation with the FHWA and the FTA, at a meeting held on December 5, 2016.

Tables 1 through 5 list these amounts by year and by funding category, and compares them to the actual amounts programmed in the TIPs and STIP. Following are the revenue assumptions used in developing these tables.
  1. Dollar amounts shown in federal funding categories are based, except as otherwise noted below, on the Fixing America's Surface Transportation (FAST) Act (Pub. L. No. 114-94) federal-aid apportionment tables, or equivalent data, obtained from the FHWA, the FTA, and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), as appropriate.
  2. NJDOT's Cost Estimating Guideline provides the methodology for developing, documenting and reviewing construction cost estimates throughout the project development process. Various cost estimating methods are used including; historical bid-based estimating, analogous or similar project estimating, historical percentages estimating, and cost-based estimating. All NJDOT projects are to include inflation when providing future year construction cost estimates at 3%. The NJDOT uses ASSHTOW Project Cost Estimation software for preparing construction cost estimates to produce more accurate and consistent estimates throughout the engineering cycle.
  3. Funds in the Surface Transportation Program (STP) and Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) categories are broken down into the allocations and minimums required by federal law.
  4. "High Priority" funds and "demo" funds are shown only as authorized by federal legislation. These Congressional earmark projects are shown with the fund type "DEMO" in the STIP.
  5. The state will provide $2.0 billion in FY 2018 and FY 2019 to support the capital program. For programming purposes, it is assumed that the NJDOT's share of state funds, or TTF, is $1,324.0 million and $1,240.0 million in FY 2018 and FY 2019, respectively. NJ TRANSIT's share of the TTF is $676.0 million in FY 2018 and $760.0 million FY 2019.
  6. The following transfers are programmed between the NJDOT and NJ TRANSIT:
    1. For FYs 2018-2021, $50 million (in FY2018) and $75 million, (in FYs 2019-2021) of FHWA Congestion Management Air Quality (CMAQ) funds, and $1 million of TAP funds are to be transferred annually for use by NJ TRANSIT;
    2. For FY 2018, $85 million of FHWA STP sub-allocated funds are to be flexed to NJ TRANSIT in return for $85 million of TTF funds for local project support by the NJDOT;
Because New Jersey is classified as a "non-attainment" area with regard to air quality, certain project funding must meet a federal standard of "available or committed" revenue in FY 2018 and FY 2019 to be considered fiscally constrained. Such projects are those which are funded with federal resources, and all other "projects of regional significance" regardless of funding source. All federal funds in FY 2018 and FY 2019 are based on the current federal-aid apportionment tables allocations or equivalent data obtained from the FHWA, the FTA and the FAA, as appropriate, and are therefore considered available. All TTF funding for FY 2018 was appropriated July 1, 2017. Sufficient funds are available or committed to cover funding of projects and programs in the FY 2018 - FY 2019 period. New Jersey's transportation authorities also use their own revenues to fund various projects classified as "projects of regional significance." These projects are listed in Section VIII.

The state of New Jersey has made a significant commitment to public transportation through continued operating support from the state's general fund. Since the inception of NJ TRANSIT, the state has contributed nearly $7.5 billion of operating assistance, nearly $3.2 billion in the last 10 years alone. During the same 10-year period, the state also has chosen to supplement that operating assistance with over $1 billion of funding, allocated to transportation operations from the state's general fund contribution, to the TTF.

With two notable exceptions, federal and state funds are not "allocated" to - that is, required to be spent within the boundaries of - the state's three MPOs. The first exception is for STP funds, some of which are required under a formula in federal regulations to be allocated directly to MPOs. These allocated funds are shown in the following tables as "STP-NJTPA," "STP-DVRPC," "STP-SJTPO," and "TAP." The second exception for is Trust Fund state-aid funds, which are allocated on a county-by-county basis under a statutory and regulatory formula.

The actual budgeting of federal and state funds for projects within the MPO areas is a product of the development of the three regional TIPs, the STIP, and legislative approval of the annual Transportation Capital Program. On a statewide basis, the cost of projects programmed for a particular fiscal year must equal the planned resources for that year. Each project must also be assigned to a funding category that is appropriate for the project, and for which adequate funding is available. From year to year there may be significant variations in the amount of funds actually programmed within an MPO area, as needs and specific project implementation schedules dictate. These programming decisions are made on a cooperative basis with the participation of the NJDOT, NJ TRANSIT, local government representatives, other agencies (all of whom are members of the MPOs), the State Legislature, citizens' groups, and the general public.

For the purpose of defining a project line item estimate in the STIP, each item includes an estimate of independent contractor costs to produce the project, an estimate of implementing agency costs anticipated in support of the development and delivery of the project, and any payments to third parties regarding matters of right-of-way and utility relocations. The implementing agency costs include activities such as; inspection, testing, equipment and salary costs.

The current STIP and Capital Program provides funding for the NJDOT and NJ TRANSIT employee salaries, leave and fringe benefits, overhead, and other administrative costs which benefit the development and delivery of their transportation programs. This funding is provided from both federal-aid and state TTF sources, and these funds are allocated for multi-year and previously authorized project costs. Federal-aid in support of employee and administrative costs is programmed on an individual project basis. TTF funding is programmed as a single item under the heading of "Program Implementation Costs, NJDOT". For NJ TRANSIT, TTF funding is allocated to specific programs.

Table 6 shows the overall distribution of funds within the STIP, by MPO. Tables 7 through 10 provide detailed breakdowns of expenditures, by funding category, for each of the three MPOs, and for statewide programs.
j. Advance Construction Projects

Advance Construction (AC) is a procedure to advance a federally funded project phase into the current fiscal year and implement that phase with other than federal funds. The use of AC is subject to the availability of other than federal funds (e.g., state funds) in the year in which the project is to be implemented, and the availability of federal funds in the year in which the AC project is to be converted to a regular federal-aid project. AC projects are to be listed individually in the TIPs and STIP in both the year that the project is to be implemented and the year in which the conversion is to take place. Appropriate notification will be provided in the TIPs and STIP so it is clearly understood that these "other funds" are available and that future federal funds may be committed to these AC projects. Fiscal constraint must be maintained throughout this process for both the implementing and conversion years. The MPOs and the state agree that the inclusion of an AC project in the TIP/STIP, in the year the project is to be implemented, signifies that the project can be converted to federal funding when federal funds become available and the decision is made to convert.
k. Multi-Year Funding

Multi-year funding is an innovative financing technique to program and authorize only that portion of a given project phase necessary to support reimbursement of planned cash outlays for a given year. Remaining portions of the project phase are programmed in subsequent years. In the first fiscal year of funding for a multi-year funded phase of work, the NJDOT will only seek federal authorization for that portion of the federal funds shown in that fiscal year in the STIP. The remaining balance of funds, for that particular phase of work, will appear in the STIP in the fiscal year that the NJDOT intends to request federal authorization for the remaining funds needed for continuation/completion of the phase/project. Each multi-year federally funded project will be submitted to the FHWA with the condition that authorization to proceed is not a commitment or obligation to provide federal funds for that portion of the undertaking not fully funded herein. Fiscal constraint will be maintained at all times throughout this process.

In the event that sufficient federal funding is not available in any fiscal year to complete a multi-year funded phase of work, the NJDOT will take full responsibility to fund that portion of the phase of work, in accordance with applicable federal and New Jersey State law. In the event that state or other funding would not be available to complete a project, the project may be terminated or placed on hold until such time as funding is made available. In such cases, the NJDOT would need to comply with applicable federal and New Jersey State law, including, where applicable, providing a revised air quality conformity determination to the FHWA/FTA, and reimbursing the FHWA/FTA for any federal funds expended on the project.

Table 11 shows current, and future, fiscal year funding needed to complete multi-year federally funded highway projects. Table 11 contains NJDOT-led construction projects, ranging from just over $18 million to over $229 million in value. The federal multi-year construction level peaks in FY 2021, with approximately $391.2 million of payments due. Table 12 shows current, and future, fiscal year funding needed to complete multi-year state funded highway projects. The individual project pages in the STIP contain specific information for these projects, such as; a detailed project description, project funding source and a total estimated project cost. Table 13 shows current, and future, fiscal year funding and the estimated total funding needed to complete federal equipment lease payments for transit projects.
l. Non-Federal Match - Toll Credit

Toll Credits were created in the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21), and are to be used as credits toward the non-federal matching share of programs authorized by Title 23 (except for the emergency relief program) and for transit programs authorized by Chapter 53 of Title 49.

The amount of credit earned is based on revenues generated by the toll authority (i.e., toll receipts, concession sales, right-of-way leases or interest), including borrowed funds (i.e., bonds, loans) supported by this revenue stream, that are used by the toll authority to build, improve or maintain highways, bridges and/or tunnels that serve interstate commerce. The federal government has allowed state and local governments to use toll credits as part of the 20% local matching funds in regard to transit grants. This allowance results from the recognition that different modes of transportation are interconnected. Capital expenditures to reduce congestion in a particular corridor benefit all modes of transportation in that corridor, be they automobiles, transit buses, or a rail system.

New Jersey estimates that it will begin federal FY 2018 with a balance of $5,257 million in available toll credits. Both the NJDOT and NJ TRANSIT use approximately $275 million in toll credits each year, and earn $900 million in additional toll credits annually. By the end of federal FY 2021 an estimated balance of $7,757 million in toll credits is expected to be available.

Toll Credits Availability for Soft Match* ($ in millions)
 
FFY
2018
FFY
2019
FFY
2020
FFY
2021
Toll Credit Starting Balance
$5,257
$5,882
$6,507
$7,132
New Toll Credits Earned
$900
$900
$900
$900
Toll Credits Used for Soft Match
-$275
-$275
-$275
-$275
Toll Credit Ending Balance
$5,882
$6,507
$7,132
$7,757
* Projected amounts for the NJDOT and NJ TRANSIT, assuming federal apportionments remain flat and requests for new toll credits remain steady.
With the assumption that federal funds apportionments will continue to remain flat and a steady or increasing request for additional credits will continue, there is an expectation for the available balance of toll credits to accrue over the next 10 years. With new credits outpacing usage, New Jersey expects to have sufficient toll credits to continue to utilize the soft match of federal funds over the entire 10 year plan.
m. Maintaining the Federal Aid Highway System

The FHWA and the FTA expect states to adequately maintain facilities on the designated federal-aid system. In New Jersey, the federal-aid system includes transportation facilities under the jurisdiction of many agencies, including; the NJDOT, NJ TRANSIT, counties, certain municipalities and authorities. To date, the FHWA/FTA has not specified the levels at which the system(s) need(s) to be maintained. Prior to MAP-21, the FHWA and the FTA left that decision to the state agencies, MPOs, and local decision making processes. MAP-21 initiates a process to define asset management standards.

The NJDOT inspects all bridges in New Jersey over 20 feet in length every two years. Standards for measuring the condition of bridges have been established nationally, and the program carried out by the NJDOT provides a very good assessment of the health of all the state's bridges greater than twenty-feet long, regardless of owner. Under MAP-21 legislation, it is expected that states will be charged with meeting or making progress toward a minimum performance level of 90% sufficiency for bridges on the National Highway System (NHS). Bridges on the NHS include not only NJDOT owned bridges, but also bridges owned by counties and other jurisdictions.

There are 6,702 highway carrying bridges over 20 feet long in the state. The NJDOT and county and municipal governments own the largest portion of this population, followed by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority (NJTA) and NJ TRANSIT. Statewide, there are 580, or 8.65%, "structurally deficient" bridges, with the remaining 91.35% of bridges classified as "structurally acceptable" condition. It is important to note that a "structurally deficient" bridge does not equate to an unsafe bridge. If any bridge were deemed unsafe, the state would take immediate action to bring the bridge to a safe condition or close the bridge to traffic.

Annual investments, of approximately $1 billion, over the next ten years are planned for bridge rehabilitation and replacement projects. This work includes, but is not limited to; re-decking, seismic retrofitting, security measures, cleaning and repainting of structural steel, substructure repairs and other improvements. Additionally, preservation and maintenance funding will be provided for bridge repairs.

Performance at this investment level is expected to reduce the growth rate of the structural deterioration backlog, and maintain the present system condition level. Capital maintenance investments are also designated to improve the structural integrity of state owned bridge assets.

The state's road network consists of approximately 38,566 centerline miles of pavement. The NJDOT, the NJTA, and the SJTA maintain approximately 2,685 centerline miles, with the remaining pavement under the responsibility of counties, municipalities and other jurisdictions. Pavement system assets are placed into sub classes defined by the condition levels of "Good," "Fair," and "Deficient (Poor)." Approximately 70% of the NJDOT's, the NJTA's and the SJTA's pavement lane miles are in an acceptable condition (Good and Fair).

County-owned roads make up a large portion of the federal-aid system, however, there is no comprehensive data available on the condition of the county-owned network. Each county is responsible for managing its own network of roads, which include facilities both on and off the federal-aid system, and each county may have its own way to measure performance. A similar situation applies to the toll facilities.

To get an adequate picture of the condition of pavement on the federal-aid system, it will be necessary to establish a standard of measure(s) that would be used, across all jurisdictions, and to initiate an effort to collect data using such a measure(s). While the FHWA has yet to establish MAP-21 performance measures and targets, the NJDOT and its regional planning partners are in consultation with each other in preparation for those measures being established.

Bridges and pavements make up the largest investments on the federal-aid system, but it is important to recognize that there are other assets that need to be maintained, such as signing, lighting, guiderail and other roadway appurtenances. These assets are in a very good state of repair, and the NJDOT does not expect them to degrade significantly over the next 10 years. The NJDOT makes a concerted effort to address any items that are in a state of disrepair as quickly as possible.
n. Maintaining the Transit System

The FTA oversees NJ TRANSIT's system with respect to state of good repair. In 2009, the FTA conducted a thorough review of NJ TRANSIT's state of good repair efforts as part of the FTA's financial capacity assessment of the agency. That effort, for which the FTA engaged consultant support, included both a review of NJ TRANSIT's current infrastructure condition and the agency's 20 year capital program. The review concluded that NJ TRANSIT's infrastructure and rolling stock are, generally, in a state of good repair.

A total of 11 Port Authority of New York and New Jersey PATH Disaster Relief Funding programs and one NJ TRANSIT program are reinstated in the FY 2018-2027 STIP. As per FTA's request, funds must be shown in the fiscal year that the grant application is submitted. These programs include work to Substations and Track work Repair and Restoration.
o. How to use this document

The individual descriptions, found in Sections III through VII, provide detailed information for each project or program in the 10-year plan. The top portion for each project/program lists the project/program name (route and section) and the location of the project/program. The Project ID reference number is assigned at project inception and remains with that project until its completion. These are the same reference numbers used by the MPOs in their TIPs. Specific information contained within the detailed project/program description includes; county, municipality, MPO jurisdiction, mileposts (for state highway projects), structure number (for bridge projects), project sponsor, asset management category, air quality code used in the conformity determination process, and financial plan requirement. An explanation of the asset management categories and air quality codes can be found in the Glossary, located in Section XII of this document. The anticipated funding schedule for each project/program is displayed in the columns at the bottom of each project page. The phases of work and types of funds are further defined in the Glossary.
Section 1: Capital Investement Strategy Categories/Asset Categories

The New Jersey Statewide Capital Investment Strategy (SCIS) classifies projects according to the type of work to be done.
Airport Assets
This classification includes work that is anticipated to preserve, maintain and improve NJ Aviation facilities for the development of an efficient air transportation system that responds to the needs of its users and the public. Administration of NJ Aviation System includes Public Use Airports that consist of a complex system of facilities operated by State, County, Municipal and private entities.
Bridge Assets
This classification includes projects which are designed to keep existing bridges functioning and in a state of good repair, including work which rehabilitates or replaces existing bridges to current design standards. Examples of work included within this classification are:
  • Bridge rehabilitation and replacement
  • Bridge deck rehabilitation and replacement
  • Bridge capital maintenance
  • Bridge management
  • Dams
Capital Program Delivery
This classification includes program implementation costs for various phases of projects, including construction, contractor support, planning programs and studies, scoping and design, right-of-way and utility work, and quality assurance.
Congestion Relief
This classification encompasses work that improves the flow of people and goods along transportation corridors. Specific programs under this heading include highway operational improvements, bottleneck widening, missing links, major widening, intelligent transportation systems and travel demand management.
Local Systems Support
This classification provides for development and implementation of transportation improvements on the local roadway network. Examples of program categories within this classification are local aid to counties and local aid to municipalities, bicycle/pedestrian, regional planning and project development.
Mass Transit Assets
This classification includes light rail, rail and bus physical assets required to bring the transit system to a state-of-good-repair. Examples of work within this classification include:
  • Track
  • Structures
  • Electric Traction
  • Signaling
  • Rolling Stock, rail cars and buses
  • Rail Stations, bus terminals, shelters
Multimodal Programs
This classification includes work that addresses improvements/provisions for alternative modes of transportation. Program categories within this classification include goods movement, bicycle/pedestrian, ferries, paratransit, intermodal connections, rail, maritime and other modes.
Road Assets
This classification includes projects which are designed to keep the existing highway system functioning and in a state of good repair, including work which upgrades segments of the system to current design standards (e.g. safety treatments that are part of a general roadway project such as signs, guiderail, barrier curb, traffic signals as opposed to individual line-item programs that exclusively include signs or traffic signals only). Examples of work included in this classification are:
  • Resurfacing
  • Highway Rehabilitation and Reconstruction
  • Pavement Management System
  • Drainage Management
  • Landscape
  • Environmental Remediation
Safety Management
This classification includes safety programs aimed at reducing the frequency and severity of crashes and promoting the all-round engineering, education, and enforcement approach of Safety First. "Safety First" is further reflected in several other NJDOT supported projects that utilize the 4E's (Engineering, Education, Enforcement, and Emergency Medical Services (quicker response and care) and other measures to enhance safety and reduce crashes. Examples of safety management programs are:
  • Intersection Improvement Program
  • Safe Corridors
  • Accident Reduction
  • Cross Median Crash Prevention
  • Rail Highway Grade Crossing, Cape May
  • Rail Highway Grade Crossing, State
  • Rail Highway Grade Crossing, Federal
  • Train Preemption for Traffic Signals North
  • Safety Projects
  • Safety Capital Maintenance
  • Betterments, Safety
  • Restriping Program
  • Traffic Signal Replacement
  • Safety Management System
  • Motor Vehicle Crash Records
  • Rockfall Mitigation
Transportation Support Facilities Assets
This classification includes projects designed to preserve, maintain and improve physical plant infrastructure including office buildings, rest areas, maintenance facilities, toll plazas and existing park and ride locations. Bus stops and train stations are included under Mass Transit Assets.
Section 2: Core Mission

The Department's mission has been broken up into five Core Missions as part of Governor Christie's Performance Budgeting Initiative. Performance data and expenditures are tied to the Core Missions listed below.
Infrastructure Preservation
Projects and programs with a primary focus on preserving, rehabilitating, or reconstructing existing physical assets, such as roads and bridges.
Safety
Projects and programs with a primary focus on improving public health and safety of motorists, pedestrians, cyclists and other users of the transportation network by reducing transportation-related fatalities and injuries.
Operations and Maintenance
Routine and regular expenditures required to keep the highway surfaces, shoulders, roadsides, structures, and traffic control devices in usable condition; maintain facilities; purchase winter operations equipment, light trucks, cars, and construction equipment; and respond to winter storms and emergencies. This core mission also include administrative operations such as human resources, budget and accounting, which support more than one of the core missions.
Mobility and Congestion Relief
Projects and programs with a primary focus on maintaining or increasing the movement of passengers and goods. Projects and programs that are not safety or infrastructure, but that improve quality of life.
Mass Transit
Passenger transportation services operating on established schedules along designated routes or lines with specific stops and is designed to move relatively large numbers of people at one time.
Section 3: Phases of Work

This classification indicates the stage of development of a project as it moves through the project delivery process. The phases of feasibility assessment (FA) and preliminary design (PD) are no longer being conducted on new projects, but some projects have been grandfathered through completion of these phases. The current NJDOT project delivery process in order of occurrence is problem statement (PS), concept development (CD), preliminary engineering (PE), final design (DES), right of way (ROW), utilities (UTI), and construction (CON). The terms below define various phases of work.
CAP (Capital Acquisition)
Term used to denote the acquisition of rolling stock by NJ TRANSIT. Statewide Investment (SWI)-NJ TRANSIT uses this designation to describe a series of coordinated smaller-scale projects in multiple locations, and in multiple phases of work, that address a specific mobility issue.
CD/LCD - Concept Development
The Concept Development Phase purpose is to identify and compare reasonable alternatives and strategies that address a well-defined and well-justified Purpose and Need Statement and select a Preliminary Preferred Alternative (PPA). The PPA is selected based on several factors, including environmental impacts, constructability, cost effectiveness, and if the project can be constructed in a timely manner. This phase involves data collection, internal and external stakeholder coordination, and alternatives analysis. Along with the PPA, key products that are produced in this Phase include the Purpose and Need Statement, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Classification, and the Concept Development Report. CD denotes NJDOT Concept Development Phase; LCD denotes concept development by a local entity (MPO, county, municipality).
CON - Construction
The construction phase refers to the phase or type of work involving the actual building of a project.
DES - Final Design
The purpose of the Final Design Phase is to produce the project's construction contract documents (i.e., Final Plans, Specifications, and Cost Estimate (PS&E) for use in soliciting bids from prospective contractors, and advancing the project to the Construction Phase. This Phase includes the continuation and completion of environmental and engineering tasks initiated in the Preliminary Engineering Phase, such as roadway design, bridge design, right of way and access engineering, utility engineering, environmental permits and clearances, and community outreach. The completion of those tasks will involve various internal and external project stakeholders. Stakeholder coordination ranges from onboard project review meetings with internal offices to efforts with local officials, the general public and other State and federal agencies. Efforts with the public and local officials are guided by a project-specific public involvement action plan. The Final Design Phase is completed when the project is authorized for construction, which initiates the Construction Phase of project delivery.
EC - Design and Construction
Funding is provided for both design and construction costs.
ERC - Design, Right of Way and Construction
Funding is provided for design, right of way, and/or construction costs.
FA/LFA - Feasibility Assessment
A phase of work intended to develop feasible project proposals that produce the best balance among transportation needs, environmental values, public concerns and costs. The end products of scoping are: a recommended scheme with a realistic cost estimate; an approved environmental document; reasonable assurance that environmental permits can be obtained; community support, or documentation explaining why such support cannot reasonably be obtained; and identification of right of way (ROW) needs and costs. Scoping consists of two phases in NJDOT: Feasibility assessment and final scope development. FA denotes feasibility assessment by NJDOT; LFA denotes local feasibility assessment by a local entity (MPO, county, municipality).
PD/LPD - Preliminary Design
Preliminary design is the process of advancing preliminary engineering and obtaining formal community and environmental approval of the Initially Preferred Alternative. PD denotes preliminary design by NJDOT; LPD denotes local preliminary design by a local entity (MPO, county, municipality).
PE/LPE - Preliminary Engineering (PE, LPE)
The Preliminary Engineering Phase involves performing engineering tasks and technical environmental studies to obtain formal community consensus (through a public information center) of the study and to secure the approval of the environmental document. If a design exception is necessary on a project, preparation and approval of the Design Exception Report will occur during this Phase. During the Preliminary Engineering Phase a number of activities are simultaneously set in motion based on the PPA such as community involvement (meetings with affected property, business owners), agency consultation, environmental documentation, design level mapping, and the development of geometric design. PE denotes NJDOT Preliminary Engineering Phase; LCD denotes preliminary engineering by a local entity (MPO, county, municipality).
PLS - Planning Study
A phase or type of work involving traffic studies needs analyses, corridor studies, and other work preparatory to project development. See also "Concept Development."
PRD - Project Development
A phase or type of work used by NJ TRANSIT which is intended to develop feasible project proposals that produce the best balance among transportation needs, environmental values, public concerns and costs.
PS - Problem Screening
The Problem Screening Phase is the entrance into the delivery process for any potential project. The purpose of the phase is to investigate a potential transportation problem. A potential problem is developed into a Problem Statement (PS) and submitted to Capital Investment Strategies (CIS). The sources of the Problem Statement may include NJDOT Management Systems, Planning Studies, a Metropolitan Planning Organization, or internal and external stakeholders. This phase involves a Tier 1 Screening, a Tier 2 Screening or a Management System Initiative Screening. If the problem is validated, a recommendation is advanced for review and approval by the Capital Program Screening Committee (CPSC) and the Capital Program Committee (CPC).

The objective of the Problem Screening Phase is to effectively, efficiently, and consistently screen transportation problems in agreement with the Statewide Capital Investment Strategy (SCIS) and project prioritization criteria. Achieving this goal is expected to produce selective proposals that are consistent with the SCIS performance related goals, objectives and investment targets for potential advancement while conforming to State and federal requirements.
ROW - Right of Way (ROW)
A general term denoting land, property, or interest therein, usually in a strip acquired for or devoted to transportation purposes.
UTIL - Utility (UTIL)
In some cases, the utility relocation work associated with a project must be programmed separately from the actual construction phase of work. These items are shown under the "Utility" category.

Projects are funded under various funding categories, depending on the type of work to be done.
a. NJDOT Funding Categories
BRIDGE-OFF
This federal-aid funding category provides funds for the rehabilitation or replacement of bridges defined as structurally deficient and/or functionally obsolete according to federal definitions. This funding is used for bridges that are off the federal-aid highway system.
CMAQ - Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality
This federal-aid funding category was established under the federal Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA) to provide funding for projects that improve air quality and/or relieve congestion without adding new highway capacity. This program was designed to help states meet their Clean Air Act obligations. The federal Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-21) has an increased focus on addressing PM-2.5.
DEMO - Demonstration Funds
Federal transportation acts sometimes target specific projects in various states in addition to general programs for federal support. This funding category includes "demonstration" funding provided under ISTEA, as well as "high priority project" funding provided under Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21) and Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU). These projects with "demonstration" or "high priority project" funding often have special rules of use.
FBP - FHWA Ferry Boat Program
Federal funds are allocated for improvements to ferry boats and ferry terminal facilities throughout the state.
HSIP - Highway Safety Improvement Program
This federal-aid funding category was established under SAFETEA-LU with the purpose of significantly reducing traffic fatalities and serious injuries on all public roads in a comprehensive and strategic manner consistent with the State's Strategic Highway Safety Plan. MAP-21 has continued this program with a focus on performance measures and targets.
LTAP - Local Technical Assistance Program
Federal funds are allocated for the center that provides information and training to local governments and agencies to foster a safe, efficient, and environmentally sound surface transportation system by improving skills and increasing knowledge of the transportation workforce and decision makers.
NHFP - National Highway Freight Program
As established by FAST-Act, the National Highway Freight Program provides support to improve the efficient movement of freight on the National Highway Freight Network (NHFN) and support of several goals, as set by the State's freight investment plan.
NHPP - National Highway Performance Program
As established by MAP-21, the National Highway Performance Program provides support for the construction of new facilities on the National Highway System (NHS), the condition and performance of the NHS, and achieving performance targets, as set by that State's asset management plan.
OTHER
This represents funding provided from other sources, including but not limited to, bi-state and autonomous authorities, private entities, and local governments.
PANY&NJ
This represents funding provided by Port Authority of New York and New Jersey
PL/PL-FTA - Planning ()
This federal-aid funding category provides funds for the federally mandated transportation planning process conducted within each Metropolitan Planning Organization.
RHC - Rail-Highway Grade Crossings Program
This is a federal funding category which is intended to develop and implement safety improvement projects to reduce the number and severity of crashes at public highway-rail grade crossings. Eligible activities include: signing and pavement markings at crossings; active warning devices; crossing surface improvements; sight distance improvements; grade separations; and the closing and consolidation of crossings.
RTP - Recreational Trails Program
New Jersey's Recreational Trails Program provides grants to public agencies and non-profit organizations for a variety of trail projects. The NJ Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Parks and Forestry, is the administrator of the program.
SPR/SPR-FTA - Statewide Planning and Research
Federal law requires a percentage of funds allocated to states for highway improvements to be devoted to planning and research activities.
STBGP - Surface Transportation Program
The Surface Transportation Block Grant Program is a federal-aid funding category established under the FAST Act. Sub-allocations must be made to urbanized and non-urbanized areas (STBGP-NJ, funding provided to NJTPA; STBGP-STU, funding provided to DVRPC; STBGP-SJ, funding provided to SJTPO). This was previously known as the Surface Transportation Program, which was established under ISTEA and encompasses funding previously made available under various smaller federal-aid categories as well as a broad, flexible component.
STATE
The "STATE" or "TTF" category is used to show the disposition of funding received from the New Jersey Transportation Trust Fund.
TBD - To Be Determined
Funding has not yet been determined for the unconstrained years of the Capital Program.
TAP - Transportation Alternatives Program
The Transportation Alternatives Program provides funding for programs and projects defined as transportation alternatives, including on- and off-road pedestrian and bicycle facilities, infrastructure projects for improving non-driver access to public transportation and enhanced mobility, community improvement activities, and environmental mitigation; recreational trail program projects; safe routes to school projects; and projects for the planning, design or construction of boulevards and other roadways largely in the right-of-way of former Interstate System routes or other divided highways.
b. NJ TRANSIT Funding Categories

NJ TRANSIT funding categories are indicated generally by reference to federal statutory categories and are identified as follows:
CASINO REVENUE
Annual allocation of the 8.5% of the Casino Revenue Fund appropriated for transportation services for senior citizen and disabled residents.
COPS - Certificates of Participation
Funds freed up on existing COPS Notes substituting insurance policy for a cash reserve fund to guarantee payment to the note holders.
CMAQ - Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality
This federal-aid funding category was established under the federal Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA) to support projects which improve air quality and/or relieve congestion without adding new highway capacity. These funds are especially targeted for states like New Jersey with serious air quality problems.
FFGA - Full Funding Grant Agreements
FFGAs are authorized under Federal transit law and are the designate means for providing new starts funds to projects.
MATCH
These are local funds that are needed to match federal funding (JARC and SECT 5311).
METRO-NORTH
Funding received from the Metro-North Commuter Railroad of the New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority.
OPER - Operating
These are fare box revenue funds.
OTHER
Third-party funds represent funding provided from other sources, including but not limited to, bi-state and autonomous authorities, private entities, and local governments.
PANY-NJ
This represents funding provided Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.
SECT 5307 - Section 5307
Under MAP-21 this program has been consolidated to include the Job Access and Reverse Commute (JARC) program (formally SECT 5316). Federal Transit Administration Urbanized Area Formula Program, including funding for Transportation Enhancements (SECT 5307-TE), Transportation Alternatives Program (SECT 5307-TAP), and Associated Transit Improvements (SECT 5307-ATI).
SECT 5309 - Section 5309
See SECT 5339 (Bus and Bus Facilities Program).
SECT 5310 - Section 5310
Enhanced Mobility of Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities. This program provides formula funding to increase the mobility of seniors and persons with disabilities. The former New Freedom Program (SECT 5317) is folded into this program.
SECT 5311 - Section 5311
Non-urbanized Area Formula Program - Federal funding is provided for rural public transportation programs. (formerly known as the Section 18 Program). Job Access and Reverse Commute (JARC) program funds are also eligible under the Rural Area Formula Program.
SECT 5324 - Section 5324
Assists States and public transportation systems with emergency-related expenses. Emergencies are defined as natural disasters affecting a wide area or a catastrophic failure from an external cause for which the governor of a State has declared an emergency or the President has declared a major disaster. The program funds capital projects to protect, repair, reconstruct or replace equipment and facilities. It also funds transit agency operating costs related to evacuation, rescue operations, temporary public transportation service or changing public transportation route service before, during or after an emergency in an area directly affected.
SECT 5326 - Section 5326
Transit Asset Management. MAP-21 requires FTA to define the term "state of good repair" and create objective standards for measuring the condition of capital assets, including equipment, rolling stock, infrastructure, and facilities. All FTA grantees and their subrecipients are required to develop transit asset management plans. FTA will support this effort through technical assistance, including the development of an analytical process or decision support tool that allows recipients to estimate their capital investment needs over time and assists with asset investment prioritization.
SECT 5337 - Section 5337
MAP-21 establishes a new formula-based State of Good Repair grant program dedicated to repairing and upgrading the nation's rail transit systems along with high-intensity motor bus systems that use high-occupancy vehicle lanes, including bud rapid transit (BRT). This program replaces the Fixed Guideway Modernization program (SECT 5309). Projects are limited to replacement and rehabilitation, or capital projects required to maintain public transportation systems in a state of good repair. Projects must be included in a Transit Asset Management Plan to receive funding. The new formula comprises: (1) the former Fixed Guideway Modernization formula; (2) a new service-based formula; and (3) a new formula for buses on HOV lanes.
SECT 5339 - Section 5339
Bus and Bus Facilities Formula grant program. A new formula grant program which replaces Section 5309. This capital program provides funding to replace, rehabilitate, and purchase buses and related equipment, and to construct bus-related facilities. Funds are eligible to be transferred by the state to supplement urban and rural formula grant programs (SECT 5307 and SECT 5311, respectively).
SECT 5340 - Section 5340
High Density and Growing State Apportionments.
STATE
The "STATE" category is used to show the disposition of funding received from the New Jersey Transportation Trust Fund.
STP - Surface Transportation Program
The Surface Transportation Program is a federal-aid funding category established under ISTEA, which encompasses funding previously made available under various smaller federal-aid categories as well as a broad, flexible component. Funding must be set aside for transportation enhancement (STP-TE). Sub-allocations must be made to urbanized and non-urbanized areas (STP-NJ, funding provided to NJTPA; STP-STU, funding provided to DVRPC; STP-SJ, funding provided to SJTPO).
TAP - Transportation Alternatives Program
The Transportation Alternatives Program consolidates funding from FHWA's former Transportation Enhancements, Recreational Trails, and Safe Routes to School programs. MAP-21 eliminates the 10 percent set-aside under the Surface Transportation Program for "transportation enhancements" and replaces it with the new "transportation alternatives" program. Eligible activities are broadly defined and with respect to transit include construction, planning and design of infrastructure-related projects and systems that will provide safe routes for non-drivers, including children, older adults and individuals with disabilities to access daily needs, and historic preservation and rehabilitation of historic transportation facilities.
TOD - Transit-Oriented Development
MAP-21 creates a new discretionary pilot program for Transit Oriented Development planning grants. Eligible activities include comprehensive planning in corridors with new rail, bus rapid transit or core capacity projects.
Section 5: Metropolitan Planning Organizations

Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) are planning organizations that serve as the forum for cooperative transportation decision making for metropolitan planning areas as required by federal regulations. MPOs consist of representatives of state and local governments and major transportation agencies. There are three MPOs in New Jersey:
DVRPC - Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission
The MPO covering the counties of Mercer, Burlington, Camden, and Gloucester.
NJTPA - North Jersey Transportation Planning Authority
The MPO covering the counties of Bergen, Essex, Hudson, Hunterdon, Middlesex, Monmouth, Morris, Ocean, Passaic, Somerset, Sussex, Union and Warren.
SJTPO - South Jersey Transportation Planning Organization
The MPO covering the counties of Cape May, Atlantic, Cumberland, and Salem.
Section 6: Air Quality Codes

An alphanumeric air quality (AQ) coding scheme has been developed for projects and programs. The AQ code is applied by the MPOs as part of the conformity determination and exempt eligibility identification process.

For non-exempt projects (projects for which no exemption code applies), the first conformity analysis year following the project's opening or projected completion is listed (analysis years in the current conformity determination include 2014, 2015, 2020, 2030, and 2040). The letter following the year indicates whether the project was modeled (M) or not modeled (NM) in the regional travel demand model or if the project was analyzed using an off-model technique (O). Off-model techniques are commonly used for projects that cannot be adequately represented in the travel demand model.

The Clean Air Act regulations also provide for projects that may be exempt from the conformity analysis. An exempt project is defined as a project that primarily enhances safety or aesthetics, maintains mass transit, continues current levels of ridesharing, or builds bicycle and pedestrian facilities. There are several categories of exempt projects, and each STIP page indicates the specific exemption code (note that multiple exemption codes may apply to a particular project/program). Exempt projects in design phases are classified under the planning and technical studies category. A list of exempt categories is shown below.

Even though projects may be exempt, the MPOs may include those that represent changes in the travel demand model and those for which VMT or emissions savings have been estimated, where possible. These projects are noted by including the analysis year and modeling status within parentheses following the exemption code(s). Projects for which conformity does not apply (e.g., freight rail projects) have been labeled "NA". Projects determined to be "Not Regionally Significant" and do not fit into an exempt category have been labeled "NRS".

AQ Code Exempt Project Category
    Air Quality
A1, AQ1
Continuation of ride-sharing and van-pooling promotion activities at current levels
A2, AQ2
Bicycle and pedestrian facilities
    Exempt from Regional Emission Analysis
NR1, R1
Intersection channelization projects
NR2, R2
Intersection signalization projects at individual intersections
NR3, R3
Interchange reconfiguration projects
NR4, R4
Changes in vertical and horizontal alignment
NR5, R5
Truck size and weight inspection stations
NR6, R6
Bus terminals and transfer points
    Mass Transit
M1, MT1
Operating assistance to transit agencies
M2, MT2
Purchase of support vehicles
M3, MT3
Rehabilitation of transit vehicles
M4, MT4
Purchase of office, shop, and operating equipment for existing facilities
M5, MT5
Purchase of operating equipment for vehicles (e.g., radios, fare-boxes, lifts, etc.)
M6, MT6
Construction or renovation of power, signal, and communications systems
M7, MT7
Construction of small passenger shelters and information kiosks
M8, MT8
Reconstruction or renovation of transit buildings and structures (e.g., rail or bus buildings, storage and maintenance facilities, stations, terminals, and ancillary structures)
M9, MT9
Rehabilitation or reconstruction of track structures, track, and track bed in existing rights-of-way
M10, MT10
Purchase of new buses and rail cars to replace existing vehicles or for minor expansions of the fleet
M11, MT11
Construction of new bus or rail storage/maintenance facilities categorically excluded in 23 CFR 771
    Other
O1, X5
Engineering to assess social, economic, and environmental effects of the proposed action or alternatives to that action
O2, X6
Noise attenuation
O3, X7
Advance land acquisitions (23 CFR 712 or 23 CFR 771)
O4, X8
Acquisition of scenic easements
O5, X9
Plantings, landscaping, etc.
O6, X10
Sign removal
O7, X11
Directional and informational signs
O8, X12
Transportation enhancement activities (except rehabilitation and operation of historic O9 transportation buildings, structures, or facilities)
O9, X13
Repair of damage caused by natural disasters, civil unrest, or terrorist acts, except projects involving substantial functional, location or capacity changes
    Planning and Technical Studies
O10a, X1
Planning and technical studies
O10b, X2
Grants for training and research programs
O10c, X3
Planning activities conducted pursuant to titles 23 and 49 U.S.C
O10d, X4
Federal-aid systems revisions
    Safety
S1
Railroad/highway crossing
S2
Hazard elimination program
S3
Safer non-Federal-aid system roads
S4
Shoulder improvements
S5
Increasing sight distance
S6
Safety improvement program
S7
Traffic control devices and operating assistance other than signalization projects
S8
Railroad/highway crossing warning devices
S9
Guardrails, median barriers, crash cushions
S10
Pavement resurfacing and/or rehabilitation
S11
Pavement marking demonstration
S12
Emergency relief (23 U.S.C. 125)
S13
Fencing
S14
Skid treatments
S15
Safety roadside rest areas
S16
Adding medians
S17
Truck climbing lanes outside the urbanized area
S18
Lighting improvements
S19
Widening narrow pavements or reconstructing bridges (no additional travel lanes)
S20
Emergency truck pullovers

Memorandum Of Understanding

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING
Statewide Procedures for TIP/STIP Revisions
Among the
Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission,
North Jersey Transportation Planning Authority,
South Jersey Transportation Planning Organization,
New Jersey Transit Corporation,
and New Jersey Department of Transportation

PURPOSE
This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) establishes a set of procedures to be used for processing and implementing revisions to the Regional Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) of each of the three Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs), as well as the New Jersey Statewide Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). The three MPOs responsible for TIP revisions are the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission (DVRPC), the North Jersey Transportation Planning Authority (NJTPA), and the South Jersey Transportation Planning Organization (SJTPO). The two state agencies responsible for STIP revisions are the New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) and the New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ TRANSIT).

This MOU represents the parties' entire understanding and agreement with respect to TIP/STIP revisions and supersedes all prior agreements between and among any of the parties with respect to such revisions.
DEFINITIONS
For the purposes of this MOU the following meanings will apply:

Advance Construction - A technique which allows a State to initiate a project using non-federal funds while preserving eligibility for future federal-aid funds. Eligibility means that the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) has determined that the project technically qualifies for federal-aid; however, no present or future federal funds are committed to the project. After an Advance Construction project is authorized, the State may convert the project to regular federal-aid funding provided federal funds are made available for the project.

e-STIP 1 - A transaction tool to enhance the development and management of the TIP/STIP through Internet-based submission, processing and approval of amendments and modifications to the TIP/STIP. e-STIP reports financial information, tracks and archives amendment and modification actions and promotes interagency collaboration. It supports policy makers in making better informed decisions and promotes electronic Government services.

Fiscal Constraint - A demonstration of sufficient funds (federal, state, local or private) to implement proposed transportation system improvements, as well as to operate and maintain the entire system, through the comparison of revenues and costs.

Flexing Funds - The transfer of federal funds between the federal highway and transit programs (i.e., from Title 23 of the highway program to transit projects and from Title 49 of the transit program to highway projects) pursuant to the provisions of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA) and subsequent Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21).

Interagency Consultation Group (ICG) - A group of stakeholders consisting of state and federal agency representatives empowered to guide the transportation conformity process, review and approve the conformity demonstration's assumptions and methodology, and fulfill the federal requirement for interagency consultation. Included are members from the United States Department of Transportation - including both the FHWA and the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) - the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, the NJDOT, NJ TRANSIT, and an MPO. This group works cooperatively to insure the MPO's conformity demonstrations and processes are following federal guidance and meeting federal requirements.

Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) - An official agreement among the MPOs, the NJDOT, and NJ TRANSIT establishing the principles that will govern how revisions to the TIP/STIP are processed and implemented.

Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) - A federally mandated and federally funded transportation policy-making organization that is made up of representatives from local government and governmental transportation authorities. MPOs plan all federally funded transportation investments and serve as a forum for local officials, public transportation providers, and state agency representatives to cooperatively plan to meet a region's current and future needs.

Program Line Item - A commitment of funds to an item identified in the TIP/STIP with a specific scope of work but not a precise geographic location, the effort of which will improve the transportation system.

Project - A commitment of funds to an item identified in the TIP/STIP with a specific scope of work at a precise geographic location, the effort of which will improve the transportation system.

Project Sponsor - The lead agency with primary responsibility for implementing a project, typically the NJDOT or NJ TRANSIT, but may also include an MPO, a county or city government, or an independent authority.

Regional Transportation Plan - A federally mandated long-range transportation plan prepared by an MPO for its region.

Statewide Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) - A staged, multi-year, statewide, intermodal program of transportation projects, consistent with the statewide transportation plan and planning processes as well as metropolitan plans, TIPs, and processes.

Sub-region - The jurisdictions that comprise an MPO.

Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) - A document prepared by an MPO that lists projects that are drawn from the Regional Transportation Plan and are to be funded with FHWA/FTA funds for a multi-year period, as well as all regionally significant projects regardless of funding source.

Unobligated Prior Year Balance - The portion of the funds authorized by a federal agency that has not been obligated by the grantee and is determined by deducting the cumulative obligations from the cumulative funds authorized.
AGREEMENT
In adopting a TIP, the parties to this MOU (DVRPC, NJTPA, SJTPO, the NJDOT, and NJ TRANSIT) agree to a shared set of capital investments that implement each of the MPO's Regional Transportation Plans. After approval of the TIPs by the MPOs and the Governor of the State of New Jersey or the New Jersey Commissioner of Transportation, if so designated, each of the three TIPs for New Jersey is consolidated without revision into the New Jersey STIP, pursuant to 23 U.S.C. § 135 (Statewide Transportation Planning). The New Jersey STIP is submitted to the FHWA and the FTA for joint approval. The approved STIP serves as the reference document required under federal regulations (23 CFR § 450.216) for use by the FHWA and the FTA in approving the expenditure of federal funds for transportation projects in New Jersey.

The Federal Statewide and Metropolitan Planning regulations contained in 23 CFR Part 450 govern the development of individual MPO TIPs, the STIP, and the process for revisions of these documents. 23 CFR § 450.326 permits the use of expedited procedures to revise the TIP/STIP, as agreed to by the cooperating parties consistent with federal regulations for TIP/STIP development and approval. This MOU shall in its entirety constitute such agreement.

The parties agree to demonstrate Fiscal Constraint for all amendments and modifications to a TIP/STIP pursuant to 23 CFR Part 450 and 49 CFR Part 613 and to identify all projects involved in such revisions on a Fiscal Constraint chart to be developed by each party. The parties agree to provide the information via e-STIP. These confines apply to statewide projects and Program Line Items as well as regional and local projects.
A. AMENDMENTS
The parties agree that a TIP/STIP amendment shall be required under the following circumstances. There are two classes of amendments:
1. Major Amendment
Any TIP/STIP action which affects air quality conformity and would require a new regional conformity determination is a Major Amendment. This type of amendment requires the approval of the FHWA and the FTA. The MPO, in consultation with the ICG as necessary, will determine if the change to or addition of a project would:
a) Add a new project that is non-exempt from conformity analysis as per the Transportation Conformity Rule (40 CFR §§ 93.126 and 93.127) (unless it is deemed "Not Regionally Significant (NRS)" or can be subject to a project level analysis that would not change the conformity finding);
b) Change the project scope so that it becomes non-exempt from conformity analysis as per the Transportation Conformity Rule (40 CFR §§ 93.126 and 93.127); or
c) Change the project completion date such that it would change the conformity analysis year.

If the MPO determines that any of these conditions exists, then the change qualifies as a Major Amendment. If none of these conditions exists then the change qualifies as either a Minor Amendment or Modification.
2. Minor Amendment
Any TIP/STIP amendment which does not affect air quality conformity and does not require a new regional conformity determination may be a Minor Amendment or Modification. A Minor Amendment, like a Major Amendment, requires the approval of the FHWA and the FTA. The parties agree that, provided the TIP/STIP action is not a Major Amendment, it is a Minor Amendment under any of the following circumstances:
a) When there is an addition of a new project or program into the TIP/STIP that uses federal funds or unobligated prior year balances;
b) When there is a deletion of a project or program from the TIP/STIP that uses federal funds in its entirety from the TIP/STIP;
c) When there is an addition of a development phase to a project that results in moving all major phases of work (e.g., Construction and Right-of-Way for the NJDOT) out of the TIP/STIP;
d) When there is a funding source change for a project in the TIP/STIP from the use of non-federal funds to the use of federal funds;
e) When there is a swap of FHWA or FTA funds in exchange for a commensurate amount of non-federal funding between the NJDOT and NJ TRANSIT; or
f) When any phase of work of a project has a cost increase of more than $15,000,000.

If none of these conditions exist, and the action does not affect conformity, then the change qualifies as a Modification and section B applies.
3. Procedures
Whenever any circumstance requiring a Major or Minor Amendment occurs, the Project Sponsor shall give the MPO (whose TIP the revision affects) sufficient notice (as defined by the MPO) to acquire the necessary technical and policy level approvals. The Project Sponsor shall provide documentation with a clear explanation justifying the amendment. The Project Sponsor shall also provide the necessary project data required for the TIP/STIP listing including the funding source(s), how Fiscal Constraint shall be maintained, and sufficient descriptive information for a conformity and/or congestion management process (CMP) determination, if required.

The MPO, in consultation with the ICG, shall determine if the proposed amendment requires a new TIP/State Implementation Plan (SIP) conformity determination. If the project is exempt under the USEPA Air Quality Conformity Rule (40 CFR Parts 51 and 93), no such determination by the MPO shall be required and this MOU's procedures pertaining to Minor Amendments shall apply. If the project is not exempt, the MPO shall determine through consultation with the ICG whether a new TIP/SIP air quality conformity determination will be required and request that the ICG determine whether a project is NRS. The Project Sponsor shall provide information on the project design and scope to enable the MPO to code the travel networks for the regional emissions analysis. Upon receipt of the project design and scope information, the MPO shall conduct the regional emissions analysis.

For amendments requiring a new MPO conformity determination, the NJDOT shall forward the conformity determination for its projects to the FHWA and the FTA and apply for a joint conformity finding to be made by the FHWA and the FTA after consultation with the USEPA. Following FHWA/FTA approval, the NJDOT will notify the MPO of the approval. NJ TRANSIT shall follow the same procedures for its projects and programs.

Amendments to the TIP/STIP require public review according to their classification as Major or Minor. Major Amendments must have a 30-day public comment period as delineated by the MPO. Minor Amendments must comply with the MPO public policy document but do not require a 30-day review period.

Following amendment approval by the MPO Board, the MPO shall forward to the NJDOT or NJ TRANSIT via e-STIP a completed package containing the following documents: (a) a document acknowledging Board approval, requesting approval from the FHWA or the FTA for the amendment and providing assurance of all necessary compliance (i.e., adherence to public participation, congestion management, conformity and Fiscal Constraint requirements); (b) the TIP Modification Request Form (which states the type of project change, the action taken and the reason for the action); and (c) the revised TIP/STIP page(s). Upon receipt of this approval package from the MPO the NJDOT shall submit the STIP amendment via e-STIP to the FHWA for review and approval. NJ TRANSIT shall submit the STIP amendment via e-STIP to the FTA for review and approval.
B. MODIFICATIONS
The parties agree that all changes to the TIP/STIP that are not amendments as described above shall be considered modifications (of which there are three classes as defined below).
1. Modifications Not Requiring Further MPO Action Beyond This MOU (Informational Modifications)
The parties agree that changes to the TIP/STIP under the following circumstances do not require further MPO action and are referred to as Informational Modifications:
a) When the cost of a Concept Development or Preliminary Engineering phase of work of a project increases by an amount less than or equal to $500,000.
b) When the cost of a Final Design, Right-of-Way, or Utility phase of work of a project increases by an amount less than or equal to $1,000,000.
c) When the cost of a Construction phase of work of a project increases by an amount less than or equal to $5,000,000.
d) When the cost of a Program Line Item increases by an amount less than or equal to $5,000,000.
e) When there is additional cost for incidental right-of-way. Incidental right-of-way is the purchase of real property or a property interest (e.g., an easement) for an amount less than or equal to $250,000 that shall not involve the taking of residential or business structure(s) or environmentally sensitive property. The parties agree that if a project is listed in an approved TIP/STIP for a Final Design or Construction phase of work and an incidental right-of-way need is discovered during the Final Design phase, the right-of-way purchase may be authorized and funded as part of the Final Design or Construction phase of work of the project without modifying the TIP/STIP.
f) When either the NJDOT or NJ TRANSIT deems it appropriate to shift funding between interchangeable federal funding sources, to change the federal or state funding mix of a project and/or to introduce state funds to a project
g) When the NJDOT and NJ TRANSIT modify and use statewide Program Line Item funds throughout the State. Both agencies shall list these items, broken out by MPO, wherever appropriate. The amount of funds authorized within each program by the MPO(s) shall be included in a written notice submitted to the MPO(s) and in the updated e-STIP report available to the MPO(s).
h) When the Project Sponsor can apply federal Advance Construction procedures to a project in the TIP/STIP, provided the federal funding is shown for the project in the TIP/STIP.
i) When correcting technical information (including non-material changes to any text of the TIP/STIP, typographical errors, misspellings, and coding corrections).
2. Modifications That May Be Approved by Administrative Action (Administrative Modifications)
The parties agree that, under the following circumstances, changes to the TIP/STIP may be handled by the Executive Director of the MPO as Administrative Modifications. In each case, the Executive Director of the MPO upon consultation with the affected sub-regions may approve the action administratively.
a) When the cost of a Concept Development or Preliminary Engineering phase of work of a project increases by an amount more than $500,000 but less than or equal to $1,000,000.
b) When the cost of a Final Design, Right-of-Way, or Utility phase of work of a project increases by an amount more than $1,000,000 but less than or equal to $4,000,000.
c) When the cost of a Construction phase of work of a project increases by an amount more than $5,000,000 but less than or equal to $7,500,000.
d) When the cost of a Program Line Item increases by an amount more than $5,000,000 but less than or equal to $10,000,000.
e) When a phase of work of a project is moved among the constrained years of the TIP/STIP.
f) When a major phase of work is added to or deleted from the current year of the TIP/STIP and the overall project schedule is not adversely affected (i.e., the Construction phase of work of a project is not delayed).
g) When the Project Sponsor chooses to apply federal Advance Construction procedures to a project listed in the current year of the TIP/STIP for which federal funding has not been provided in any future year.
h) When changing a federally funded, NRS project to non-federal funding.
i) When the project experiences an excessive bid overrun subject to a 30-day acceptance by the NJDOT. An excessive bid overrun occurs when the following conditions are met:
1) When the scope of the project has not expanded from that anticipated in the TIP/STIP;
2) When the final estimated cost in the Plans, Specification and Estimate (PS&E) package agrees with the TIP/STIP programmed amount or is within the threshold permitted for a Construction phase of work by administrative action, as per section B.2.(c); and
3) When the NJDOT has received written concurrence from the FHWA that the bid would otherwise be acceptable.
j) When federal unobligated prior year balances are added to a federally-funded project or program.
k) When other modifications, not defined in this sub-section, are identified as an administrative action.
l) When the Executive Director of the MPO determines that administrative action is appropriate.
3. Modifications Requiring Committee Action (Committee Modifications)
The parties agree that the following circumstances require action by the MPO at the Committee level. Additionally the Executive Director of the MPO can determine at any time that Board action is necessary.
a) When the cost of a Concept Development or Preliminary Engineering phase of work of a project increases by more than $1,000,000.
b) When the cost of a Final Design, Right-of-Way, or Utility phase of work of a project increases by more than $4,000,000.
c) When the cost of a Construction phase of work of a project increases by more than $7,500,000 but not more than $15,000,000.
d) When the cost of a Program Line Item increases by more than $10,000,000.
e) When breaking out a new Project from the MPO's Local CMAQ Initiatives Line Item. The act of flexing those CMAQ funds to FTA for breakout Projects from the Local CMAQ Initiatives Line Item and listing them in the transit program does not require processing of an additional Project action.
f) When the Executive Director of the MPO determines that Committee action is appropriate.
4. Procedures
TIP/STIP modifications shall be processed via e-STIP with a completed package containing the following documents: (a) a document acknowledging Board approval, requesting approval from the FHWA or the FTA for the amendment and providing assurance of all necessary compliance (i.e., adherence to public participation, congestion management, conformity and Fiscal Constraint requirements); (b) the TIP Modification Request Form (which states the type of project change, the action taken and the reason for the action); and (c) the revised TIP/STIP page(s). Upon receipt of this approval package from the MPO the NJDOT shall submit the STIP amendment via e-STIP to the FHWA for concurrence. NJ TRANSIT shall submit the STIP amendment via e-STIP to the FTA for concurrence.
C. FISCAL CONSTRAINT BANK
The federal statewide and metropolitan planning rules (23 CFR Part 450 and 49 CFR Part 613) stipulate that each year of the TIP/STIP must be fiscally constrained to available resources. The parties agree to manage the demonstration of Fiscal Constraint for amendments and modifications through the establishment of a "Fiscal Constraint Bank" for each MPO and NJ TRANSIT, plus four Fiscal Constraint Banks for NJDOT (one for statewide projects and programs and one for each of the three MPO regions). Fiscal Constraint for amendments and modifications may be demonstrated by using available balances in a Fiscal Constraint Bank.
1. Addition of Funds
Funds may be added to a Fiscal Constraint Bank for a given year through any of the following means:
a) De-obligation of funds from projects that were authorized under prior TIP/STIPs.
b) Excess funds available from low bids or awards on current projects.
c) Deletions of projects from the current four-year TIP/STIP.
d) Modification to the current constrained TIP/STIP which results in a net decrease to the cost of project(s) in a given year.
e) Modification to the current constrained TIP/STIP which moves a phase of work of a project from that year to another year in the constrained TIP/STIP or to a year beyond the current constrained TIP/STIP period.
f) Additional appropriations.

In addition, federal obligation authority may be transferred from one Fiscal Constraint Bank to another Fiscal Constraint Bank at the transferring party's discretion and only when such obligation authority is available and necessary for the receiving party's projects.
2. Procedures
The NJDOT shall provide to the MPOs, via e-STIP and other formats as needed to provide sufficient information for MPO purposes, reports listing programmed projects by fund source and MPO region that have not been obligated during the current federal fiscal year. MPO action (as per section A., B.2., or B.3.) may be required for such projects for which it is determined funds will not be obligated in the current federal fiscal year. The unobligated funds may be used for subsequent amendments or modifications to address Fiscal Constraint within the MPO.

The parties agree that in accounting for Fiscal Constraint when making TIP/STIP amendments (as per section A.) or modifications (as per section B.2. or B.3.), the net result for the first fiscal year must be that the Fiscal Constraint Bank has a zero or positive balance and that the net result for the constrained TIP/STIP period must also be a zero or positive balance. This will allow for temporary imbalances in the second, third, and fourth years, but will still maintain the overall Fiscal Constraint of the TIP/STIP.

If there are no outstanding balances in the Fiscal Constraint Bank, the parties shall demonstrate Fiscal Constraint for each amendment and modification. Fiscal Constraint by year shall be demonstrated by the parties through such other amendments and/or modifications as may be necessary.

The parties agree that the NJDOT shall apply these same procedures to the statewide program Fiscal Constraint Bank. NJ TRANSIT shall apply similar procedures to its Fiscal Constraint Bank.
D. PUBLIC PARTICIPATION
The MPO shall follow its adopted public participation procedures for amendments, modifications and conformity determinations to provide the appropriate level of public involvement prior to the MPO Committee or Board taking action. The parties agree that the MPO public participation procedures shall also serve as the public participation procedures for the STIP. The NJDOT shall provide access to public participation by linking to the MPO's website sites via e-STIP. The MPO shall state in notices to the public that comments received on the proposed action to the TIP are comments on the same action to the STIP.
E. PROJECT REPORTING
The NJDOT and NJ TRANSIT agree to provide information on the TIP/STIP and project status to the MPOs. The NJDOT maintains a Project Reporting System (PRS). Project-specific information from the PRS including schedule dates, authorization dates, project costs, and pertinent issues are available to the MPOs on-line. It will be the NJDOT's responsibility to keep the information in the PRS current. It will be the responsibility of the MPOs to reformat the data into reports they deem usable.

The NJDOT Division of Capital Program Management will be the clearinghouse for additional information related to MPO project inquiries. The NJDOT shall respond to all MPO inquiries within seven (7) business days. The NJDOT Office of Community Relations will be the clearinghouse for project inquiries from local elected officials.

NJ TRANSIT is required to submit Progress Reports to the FTA on a quarterly basis. These reports will continue to be shared with the MPOs in a database format. NJ TRANSIT shall respond to all MPO inquiries within seven (7) business days.

The MPOs may request meetings for projects with critical issues at any time. Invited attendees may include local elected officials and staff, MPO staff, NJDOT and/or NJ TRANSIT project management staff, capital programming staff, and NJDOT and/or NJ TRANSIT liaison staff. The purpose of the meetings on key projects is to enhance the information flow on important projects to the community and shall supplement information provided to the MPO in the reporting requirements enumerated above.

The NJDOT and NJ TRANSIT will each produce an Annual Listing of Obligated Projects report within sixty (60) days after the close of the federal fiscal year. The report will contain all federally funded projects that were obligated during the previous federal fiscal year. The NJDOT and NJ TRANSIT reports shall be available in e-STIP. A similar listing for state funded programs and projects will be provided under separate cover.
F. DISPUTE RESOLUTION
Any party with a dispute under this MOU shall promptly notify the involved party or parties in writing. Those parties shall then submit to non-binding informal dispute resolution and meet within fifteen (15) days. The disputing parties shall endeavor in good faith to resolve their differences within thirty (30) days after meeting, or may mutually agree to extend the time for resolution.


We, the undersigned, agree to use the above procedures to amend and modify the Metropolitan Planning Organizations' Transportation Improvement Programs (TIPs) and the New Jersey Statewide Transportation Improvement Program (STIP).
 
Barry Seymour, Executive Director
Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission
Date
 
Honorable Matthew Holt, Chairman
North Jersey Transportation Planning Authority
Date
 
Honorable Frank Sutton, Chairman
South Jersey Transportation Planning Organization
Date
 
James Weinstein, Executive Director
New Jersey Transit Corporation
Date
 
Honorable James S. Simpson, Commissioner
New Jersey Department of Transportation
Date